November tree planting

November tree planting

November is an ideal time of the year to start planting Ornamental and fruit trees in your garden. A tree will add height, colour and architectural interest to a garden scheme and, if planted properly, should provide many years of enjoyment. In winter, bare-rooted plants become available – a cheaper alternative to ones in pots. Winter is the ideal time to plant bare-rooted trees and there are few simple ways to give them the best start.

rootball trees1.Position the tree in its proposed location and mark the centre of the planting hole with a cane and create a square or circular shape shape 60cm x 60 cm  in shape using a a preformed template. Cut around the perimeter of the square or circle with a spade or half moon edging iron. Carefully remove the turf to a depth of 5cm by sliding the blade of the spade or iron into the soil.

imag06692. Remove the soil from the hole to the depth of the root ball of the tree. Fork over the base of the hole to break up any compacted areas of soil. This will also allow the roots to work their way more easily through the soil to anchor the tree.Then position the stake towards the outside of the hole and insert. Then plant the fruit tree, radiating the roots of the tree in an outward direction.

 

 

imag0672 (2)3. Back fill round the hole and roots with some of the original; soil, well rotted garden compost and good handfulls of fertilser. We use a granular fertiliser like Growmore which will breakdown and provide a slow release feed whilst the roots get established. Ensure the tree is firmed in around the base using the heel of your boot. Once tree is firmly in place, we recommend using 1/2 rubber tree ties  to secure the trunk to the stake.

 

imag06744. Finally give the new tree a good watering. We suggest a full can of water for every tree. Once the water has had chance to sink in we would then apply a final layer of compost or bark mulch to the surface of the soil. Twice per annum we would then apply further handfuls of granular fetiliser around the base of the tree.

Annual maintenance ensures that the tree ties are firm but not tight around the trunk. Ensure the wooden stakes are firm in the ground and not wobbly or rotten. Replace as and when necessary.

Contact us to book your FREE consultation on Trees suitable for your garden. There is a vast array of trees ideal for small gardens, each with their own distinctive features like attractive bark, autumn colour and floral interest. Alternatively why not look at Family fruit trees. a family fruit tree is where 3 different varieties are grafted onto one trunk. There are numerous combinations available for both Apples, Pears, Plums and Cherries. The beauty of a family fruit tree is that they will self pollinate eachother, meaning you only one need a family tree in order to get fruit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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